Blay Manokan
watercolor on paper
12 x 16 inches
©2016  Edbon Sevilleno

 

finished
STEP-BY-STEP

Edbon Sevilleno

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To start, first render the top foliage while preserving your leave outs.

1

 

Close up of top foliage

2

Splattering opaque yellow greens where light should be with a rigger brush.

3

This tree will have those bluish purple shadows.

 

4

Since this is on the shaded part of the kubo (hut), it has to be dark with a bit of variation.  Note the leave out on the edge of the roof to indicate presence of light from behind.

5

With a palette knife, scratch the paint while it is about to dry to achieve this effect.

6

 

I paint the down part to complete this side of the house.  I use a 1-inch flat brush and work conscious of the shapes within the structure.

7

Now let us do the cast shadows of the house.  Again with a flat brush, apply the cast shadows with a bluish tint on it.

8

Carry on to the shadows cast by the sinampay (clothes line).

9

We are almost 50% done.

10

 

Organized confusion, I call it.

11

 

You might be wondering why I tinted the foreground with a cool tint. There is a reason for that.  Later.

12

Some tricks with a Hake brush.

 

13

People ask if I use masking fluids... well my whites are pure and honest leave outs!  It is just a matter of planning where to save your whites.

 

14

 

See it as a negative & positive, a trapped shape! We will fill that shape later.

15

Again the same thing here.  While the passage is wet, I will add the cast shadow made by the shade...

 

16
 
  

... then scratch it!
17

Let me spray a bit the foreground with clear water on a horizontal angle. There is a reason for that.

 

18

We are now working on the foreground painting shadows cast by trees beyond our sight.

After the horizontal spraying demonstrated earlier, attack quickly and spontaneously the cast shadows on the foreground.  Now you see the reason why we tinted it with cool colors.

Sometimes I have this habit of using two brushes together like a chopstick!

19

Now let us do the pole shade.  Consider this as a positive shape against the sunlit grass lawn.  Note that the top shadowed part is bluish, while the bottom is somewhat warm.

20

On the rear poles, it would be of less contrast, somewhat bluish gray and with less details.  Tiny lines on the feet is suggestive.

21

 

The rooster on the right will have less detail since it is not the focal subject.

22

The tallest bamboo pole has the strongest contrast.  This will definitely grab attention.

23

 

Almost to the finale.  The hero rooster and the caretaker on the rear end of the path.  The eye has a tendency to follow paths in and vice versa.

24

Si Tatay Andoy pumuti na ang buhok sa kanyang blay manokan.

25

 

Nadali rin ang Manok Negros!.

26

Add a bit of shadow on the clothes line on the right-hand side.   The eye will be attracted to the lighter side, leading your eye right back in.

27

These last bits of dark branches of leaves will justify our shadow in the foreground.    And done!

28
finished

Blay Manokan
watercolor on paper
12 x 16 inches
© 2016 Edbon Sevilleno

Edbon Sevilleno is a regular contributor to the IWS Philippines Learning Forum.  His tutorials, uploaded in real time, are eagerly anticipated.  The above step-by-step was compiled and shared here with his permission.   Follow the master watercolor artist from Negros on facebook.  Meet the artist at our Learning Forum.

 

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